Archive for the ‘1/2400 Naval’ Category

Seekreig 5 – Dreadnought 1906

July 8, 2017

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a WWI naval game using the Seekrieg 5 rules. The year is 1906. The British have just completed a new battleship. Navel experts claim it makes every other battleship obsolete. HMS Dreadnought and two British pre-dreadnoughts take on six German pre-dreadnoughts.

After about 4 hours of play and 20 game turns (40 minutes) we called the game. Damage results:

Pommern, 3 tiers, 12 knots
Schlesien, no damage
Braunschweig, 1 tier, boiler damage repaired
Schleswig-Holstein, light damage
Deutschland, 4 tiers, 15 knots
Hannover, 1 tier, 6 knots

Dreadnought, 4 tiers, 17 knots, both wing turrets out
Hindustan, light damage
Prince of Wales, light damage

 

Seekrieg 5 – Newcastle Raid

March 25, 2017

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a WWI naval game using the Seekrieg 5 rules. A German squadron has bombarded Newcastle and is returning home but is spotted by a British dirigible. While still 200 miles from Heligoland, it is intercepted by a British squadron to the SSW.

German Squadron:
Armored cruisers Roon, Yorck, Prinz Adalbert
Light cruiser Pillau

British Squadron:
Armored cruisers Defence, Shannon
Light cruisers Arethusa, Aurora

We quit after 11 turns due to the time. On the British side, Defence and Shannon were lightly damaged with no critical hits, Arethusa was gone and Aurora was down to 16 knots with boiler and engine damage. On the German side, Roon had more than 40% damage and had lost a main turret, Yorck was gone, Prinz Adalbert had light damage and Pillau had medium damage.

 

Seekrieg 5 – North Sea Encounter

November 26, 2016

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a WWI naval game using the Seekrieg 5 rules. Initially the game was set up with a four ship division on each side, but we scaled it down to two ships on each side due to the low holiday weekend turnout.

The forces started 20,000 yards apart in good visibility. The British had two Iron Duke class battleships and the Germans had the Baden and a Konig class. The players rolled for crew quality and all ended up the same. The game ended when the lead British ship was destroyed by a magazine explosion.

Seekrieg 5 – Falklands 1914

July 9, 2016

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a WWI naval game using the Seekrieg 5 rules. The scenario was based loosely on the situation in the Falklands in December 1914, but with significant historical revisions to produce a more balanced battle.

The scenario deviates from history just before von Spee’s squadron reaches the Falklands. Von Spee is alerted to the presence of a strong British force, hides until dawn on 9 December and then uses the cover of fog to start for the Argentine coast. The British divide their forces to search, and one element finds the Germans. The scenario was scaled to give one ship to each of the five players.

Visibility 12,000 yards.

British: battlecruiser Invincible, light cruiser Bristol

German: armored cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, light cruiser Dresden.

The German ships (especially Scharnhorst) were given an advantage in crew quality to help the scenario balance.

After about 4.5 hours of play, we stopped play. Damage was about even, mostly to Scharnhorst and Invincible. No ship had been sunk or crippled.

 

Minorca 1756 – Flying Colors

May 15, 2016

Saturday the local HMGS-South group played a Seven Years’ War naval game using the Flying Colors rules. The scenario was the battle of Minorca, 20 May 1756. The ship models are Old Glory miniatures. The scenario from the rule book starts after the approach and Byng’s tack to bring his fleet onto a parallel course with the French (Tunstall, Naval Warfare in the Age of Sail, Chapter 4). The scenario does not specify a wind speed, so the wind barb in the first photo is arbitrarily set to 10 knots.

We had to quit after about 3.5 hours of play. At that point, the French had taken mostly hull damage and the British had taken mostly sail damage. Most ships were undamaged since fire had been concentrated on a few ships.

Flying Colors Naval Game

March 21, 2015

Saturday the local HMGS-South group played a Revolutionary War naval game at the Dogs of War shop using the Flying Colors rules. The scenario was a simplified version of the battle of Cape Henry, 16 March 1781. Old Glory miniatures were used instead of the games ship counters.

The British line split into two formations and attempted to double the French van, but the French maneuvered downwind to avoid this. A 120 degree wind shift then gave the French the weather gage. The British sustained more damage overall, although the leading French ship accumulated enough hull damage to strike her colors.